Posts Tagged ‘obesity’

Global studies reveal 5 ways faith can reduce bullying, empower victims

A new wave of international scholarship addressing public concerns over bullying is extending into religious communities.
Researchers are discovering that congregations are uniquely positioned to offer the type of social support and the promotion of values such as empathy, forgiveness and love of neighbor that appear to be effective ways of addressing the issue.

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Think your God is "awwwesome?" How the answer may affect your health

Three new studies explore how faith may help or hinder individuals coping with the loss of a loved one, in the battle against obesity or in providing resources to protect against anxiety and depression.

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Morality study: What would you do for a million dollars?

A major new study now available on the Association of Religion Data Archives offers insights into how Americans apply ethical principles in the moral choices they make in their everyday lives. While most of us like to think of ourselves as merciful, kind, generous human beings, personal interests may take precedence when it comes to making real-life decisions.

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Obesity rising: Religion and food can be unhealthy combination

Other than sexuality, food is one of the most difficult topics for religious communities to talk about. Just how difficult is shown in new research indicating weight control is a notable exception to a generally positive record linking religious activitiy to positive health outcomes. In one study of some 5,500 women and men ages 45 to 84, participants were more likely to be obese the more religiously active they were. Each step of the way, from those never attending worship to those attending weekly, greater religious activity was associated with significantly higher rates of obesity.

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Religion may help obese shed pounds, gain self-esteem

Obese Americans are finding churches, synagogues and mosques can promote exercise, healthier diets and improved self-images, new research indicates. But many severely overweight women, paralyzed by real and perceived prejudice, find it easier to be “couch-potato saints” than to go out in public for the spiritual and social support that can lead to better health. One new study found obese women were more likely to affiliate with a religious congregation, but less likely than other women to attend services or participate in congregational activities.

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